Military Feature Brent Geers: Problem Solver at Heart

WMU-Cooley, as a military friendly and designated Yellow Ribbon School, talks to its military students, faculty and graduates about their journey from the military to law school and about their career goals. This month’s feature is WMU-Cooley graduate Brent Geers, a U.S. Army Sergeant and Police Team Leader who was awarded the Combat Action Badge, and is a four-time recipient of the Army Commendation Medal.

Military rank and title: SGT (E-5), U.S. Army, Military Police Team Leader/Patrol Supervisor

Why did you decide to go to law school: I’ve always been intrigued with the law in the sense that it’s a puzzle, and I like putting puzzles together. At its best, you get five out of the six pieces you need to complete the puzzle; you – the lawyer – get to create that sixth piece. I consider myself a problem solver at heart. WMU-Cooley presented the perfect opportunity to study law while working and being home to take care of family. Additionally, the courses and professionals provided exposure to real-world law from Day One, something that as an independent attorney, is something I greatly appreciate.

Tell us about your military experience: I served on active duty for five years in the U.S. Army Military Police Corps. My duty placed me in Baumholder, Germany and Fort Knox, Kentucky, with deployments to Iraq from 2003-2004 and Afghanistan from 2005-2006. My military honors include the Valorous Unit Award as part of the 527th Military Police Company for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy, and the Griffin Award as part of the 92nd Military Police Company for being the best MP unit in the U.S. Army – Europe command. I was awarded the Combat Action Badge, and am a four-time recipient of the Army Commendation Medal. While my initial intent for joining the Army was to become a CID Warrant Office, my first four years saw me assigned to what are called field MP units – convoy escorts, EPW operations, perimeter security, etc. – and so I did very little traditional law enforcement. That all changed when I arrived at Fort Knox as a twice-deployed Sergeant. Fort Knox was a training post, and the MPs assigned there did nothing but traditional law enforcement. I immediately was assigned to be a Patrol Supervisor – the equivalent of a shift supervisor – and was responsible for up to five patrols per shift. Like the police we see out here, we were “the law” at Fort Knox, responding to everything from domestic violence incidents to suicides and medical assists 24 hours a day.

Career and future goals: Long term, I want to be a district court judge. I see the district court as the place to make the most positive impact on people. District court judges have a lot more tools at their disposal to help people besides straight punishment. For now, and for the duration of my career, I enjoy helping people empower those they trust, and help them provide for those they love; specifically through estate planning. I am also focused on building a thriving criminal appellate practice.

Tell us a little about you:  I am the father to my 14-month-old daughter Marlena, and husband to my wife of almost five years, Ronda. I was born and raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and am a proud product of the Grand Rapids Public Schools (Creston High School). I graduated from the University of Michigan as a first-generation college student, earning a B.A. in American Culture, with a minor in African American Studies. I also spent a year as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer working locally on adult literacy and neighborhood improvement issues before joining the U.S. Army.

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Filed under Alumni Stories and News, Military Feature, The Value of a Legal Education, Uncategorized

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